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Churches in Jerusalem

This page attempts to enlist all the known churches in the city of Jerusalem

circa 335 CE

In Christian tradition the The Church of the Holy Sepulchre is identified as the place both of the crucifixion and the tomb of Jesus of Nazareth. The church has long been a major pilgrimage center for Christians all around the world. The Roman emperor Constantine I, a convert to Christianity, had the temple of Venus in Jerusalem demolished to make way for a church. In the course of the demolition a tomb was discovered that was thought to be the tomb of Jesus. The first Church of the Holy Sepulchre was located along the Roman Cardo.

circa 138 CE

The Church of Saint Anne is a Roman Catholic church, located at the start of the Via Dolorosa, near the Lions' Gate. and churches of the Flagellation and Condemnation, in the Muslim Quarter of the old city of Jerusalem. It is the best-preserved Crusader church in Jerusalem. It marks the traditional site of the home of Jesus’ maternal grandparents, Anne and Joachim, and the birthplace of the Virgin Mary. Next to the church is the large excavation area of the Pools of Bethesda, where Christ healed a sick man (John 5:2-9).

circa 138 CE

Facade of the Church of all Nations (Basillica of Agony). The church, known also as the Basilica of the Agony, in reference to the night that Christ spent there on the eve of his Passion, blends the architectural lines typical of the Christian basilica (the facade) with the salient features of Islamic buildings (sides, and roof with numerous small domes).

circa 950 CE

The interior of the, Saint Agnes Church, today known as the al-Maulawiya mosque was originally a tenth century mosque which was contverted in to a church by Crusaders and named "Saint Agnes Church" in 1099 CE, it was converted back to the mosque after their defeat.

circa 950 CE

The Church of Mary Magdalene stands on the western slope of the Mount of Olives, above the Garden of Gethsemane and the Church of All Nations. It commemorates the enigmatic Mary from Magdala — revered as a saint by the Orthodox, Catholic, Anglican and Lutheran churches — who was one of the few persons named in the Gospels as being present at Christ’s crucifixion and who was the first recorded witness of his Resurrection.

circa 950 CE

Church of Pater Noster at the Mount of Olives. It is part of a Carmelite monastery', also known as the Sanctuary of the Eleona (Domaine de l'Eleona). The modern Church of the Pater Noster is built right next to the site of a fourth-century basilica commissioned by Constantine I to commemorate the Ascension of Jesus Christ.

circa 950 CE

View of the Dominus Flevit Church from the courtyard, a Roman Catholic church on the Mount of Olives, opposite the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem. It is constructed in the shape of water drop to commemorate the Flevit super illam event as mentioned in the Gospel of Luke.

circa 950 CE

Chapel of Ascension at the Mount of Olives is now situated inside the courtyard of a 12th century Ayyubid mosque. Situated in the al-Tur district of Jerusalem, traditionally believed to be the earthly spot where Jesus ascended into Heaven forty days after his resurrection, according to the christian tradition. It houses a slab of stone believed to contain one of his footprints.

circa 950 CE

Church of Saint Mary of the Germans, is a Catholic church, built in Romanesque style, now in ruins, located in the Old City of Jerusalem on the northeast slope of Mount Zion.

circa 950 CE

Church of the Sepulchre of Saint Mary, also known as the Tomb of the Virgin Mary, is regarded by Christians and Muslims as the burial place for the mother of Isa (Jesus). The tomb is located in the Kidron Valley, at the foot of Mount of Olives in Jerusalem.

circa 950 CE

Nea Church of Theotokos was a Byzantine church erected by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I (ruled 527–565 CE) in Jerusalem. The church was completed in 543 and severely damaged or destroyed during the Persian conquest of the city in 614. It was further used as a source of building material by the Umayyads few decades later.

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