Mount of Olives

Mount of Olives is a mountain ridge east of and adjacent to Jerusalem's Old City. It is named for the olive groves that once covered its slopes.

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An aerial view of the Mount with Jewish cemetery. It is named for the olive groves that once covered its slopes. The southern part of the Mount was the Silwan necropolis, attributed to the ancient Judean kingdom. The mount has been used as a Jewish cemetery for over 3,000 years and holds approximately 150,000 graves, making it central in the tradition of Jewish cemeteries.

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Vew of the western slopes of Mount Olives looking from Gate of Mercy, Haram al-Sharif across the Kidron Valley, at the bottom the Muslim cemetery along the Eastern wall is also visible. In the middle of the picture the Church of All Nations is also visible.

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The Facade of the Basilica of Agony or the Church of All Nations at the Jabl-i Zaitoon (Mount of Olives). It is a Roman Catholic church, believed to enshrine a section of bedrock where Jesus is said to have prayed before his arrest. It was buit in May 1924 on the foundations of two earlier churces, one 12th century Crusader chapel and a fourth century Byzantine basilica.

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Gethsemane at the foot of Mount of Olives, to the left is the Church of all Nations, most famous as the place where Jesus prayed and his disciples slept the night before Jesus' crucifixion. The Garden of Gethsemane became a focal site for early Christian pilgrims. It was visited in 333 by the anonymous "Pilgrim of Bordeaux".

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Church of Mary Magdalene, at the Mount of Olives, is a Russian Orthodox church located on the Mount of Olives, near the Garden of Gethsemane in East Jerusalem. Built in 1886 by Tsar Alexander III to honor his mother, Empress Maria Alexandrovna of Russia. The convent is located directly across the Kidron Valley from the Haram al-Sharif. The church is dedicated to Mary Magdalene, the companion of Jesus. According to the sixteenth chapter of the Gospel of Mark, Mary Magdalene was the first to see Christ after his resurrection (Mark 16:9). The relics of two martyred saints, Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna of Russia and her fellow nun Varvara Yakovleva, are displayed in the church.

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View of the Dominus Flevit Church from the courtyard, a Roman Catholic church on the Mount of Olives, opposite the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem. It is constructed in the shape of water drop to commemorate the Flevit super illam event as mentioned in the Gospel of Luke. The site of Christ's weeping was unmarked until the Crusader era. It was during this time that people began commemorating the site. Eventually a small chapel was built there. In the early sixteenth century a mosque or madrasah existed at the site, presumably built by the Turks, from the remains of the earlier church.

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The entrance to the Tomb of Mary within the courtyard of the Crusader era (circa. 1130 CE) Church of the Virgin Mary. The cave is located in an underground rock-cut cave in the valley of Jehoshaphat, on the foothills of Mount of Olives. Church of the Sepulchre of Saint Mary, also Tomb of the Virgin Mary, is a Christian tomb in the Kidron Valley – at the foot of Mount of Olives, in Jerusalem – believed by Eastern Christians to be the burial place of Mary, the mother of Jesus.

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Church of Pater Noster at the Mount of Olives. It is part of a Carmelite monastery', also known as the Sanctuary of the Eleona (Domaine de l'Eleona). The modern Church of the Pater Noster is built right next to the site of a fourth-century basilica commissioned by Constantine I to commemorate the Ascension of Jesus Christ. The Church of the Pater Noster stands right next to the ruins of the 4th-century Byzantine Church of Eleona. The ruins of the Eleona were rediscovered in the 20th century and its walls were partially rebuilt. Today, the land on which both churches and the entire monastery are standing formally belongs to France.

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Chapel of Ascension at the Mount of Olives is now situated inside the courtyard of a 12th century Ayyubid mosque. Situated in the al-Tur district of Jerusalem, traditionally believed to be the earthly spot where Jesus ascended into Heaven forty days after his resurrection, according to the christian tradition. It houses a slab of stone believed to contain one of his footprints. Part of a larger complex consisting first of a Christian church and monastery, then an Islamic mosque, it is located on a site the faithful traditionally believe to be the earthly spot where Jesus ascended into Heaven after his resurrection.

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Jewish Cemetery on Mount of Olives. The cemetery contains around 70,000 burials some dating back to 3,000 years, including the tombs of famous figures in Jewish history. During the First and Second Temple Periods the Jews of Jerusalem were buried in burial caves scattered on the slopes of the Mount, and from the 16th century the cemetery began to take its present shape. The old Jewish cemetery sprawled over the slopes of the Mount of Olives overlooking the Kidron Valley (Valley of Jehoshaphat), radiating out from the lower, ancient part, which preserved Jewish graves from the Second Temple period.

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Looking across the Kidron Valley, towards the old city of Jerusalem. Domes of Dominus Flevit and Church of Mary Magdalene.


Points of InterestPart of
Churches/ChapelsChapel of Ascension · Church of All Nations · Church of Mary Magdalene · Dominus Flevit · Church at the Tomb of Virgin Mary · Church of Pater Noster · Convent of the Russian Orthodox · Augusta Victoria Hospital Church · Church of Bethphage Churches in Jerusalem
CemeteriesMount of Olives Jewish Cemetery
MosquesMosque of AscensionMosques in Jerusalem
HospitalAugusta Victoria Hospital
Tombs/BurialsTomb of the Virgin Mary · Tomb of Mujir al-Din · Tomb of Absalom · Tomb of Zechariah · Tomb of Beni Hazir · Tomb of Rabiyah al-'Adawiyya Tombs in Jerusalem
OthersGarden of Gethsemane · BYU Jerusalem Center · Ibrahimieh Community College
NearbyKidron Valley
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