al-Baqi' Gate (Bab al-Baqi')

By the Editors of the Madain Project

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Bab al-Baqi' (باب البقيع), al-Baqi' gate also known as the Bab al-Jum'a (باب الجمعة) is the closest located gate to the Prophet Muhammad's burial chamber. The gate was most likely first installed in 873 CE during the time of Ishaq ibn Muhammad al-Ja'di. Bab al-Baqi', gate no. 41, is one of the major gates of Masjid an-Nabawi.

Overview

It is one of the three gates (Bab al-Baqi', Bab Jibraeel, and Bab un-Nisa) on the eastern side that retain the architectural style of gates from first Saudi expansion. It marks the eastern end of the Ottoman qibla wall. There are three inscriptions over the gate's facade, top most reads; (). Second one is durood; and the third is the dua' (prayer) to enter (any) mosque. The Bab al-Baqi of Masjid an-Nabawi has been rebuilt, renovated and reconstructed several times over the centuries by several prominent Muslims.

al-Baqi Gate

Brief History

circa 1990 CE

al-Baqi Gate

After its original construction in 873 CE, it was first renovated during the Buyid era, circa 980 CE. al-Maqdisi gives details of this door as a large decorated portal in to the eastern wall of the mosque. It was renovated by Sultan Nur al-Din Zangi in circa 1960 CE, when he had the outer wall of the mosque renovated as well. Sultan had the door built out of wood, inlaid with metal plates and inscribed with his name.

Architecture

circa 1990 CE

al-Baqi Gate

Location
The Bab al-Baqi lies at the south-eastern corner of the Ottoman era Masjid an-Nabawi, directly below the al-Baqi minaret some 20 meters south of the Bab Jibrael. The Bab al-Baqi' is located closest to the Rawdha of prophet Muhammad, and directly inline with Bab as-Salam. The photograph depicts the interior of the Bab al-Baqi just after entering, to the right is the south-east corner of Prophet Muhammad's burial chamber, and the corridor in front runs towards the Bab Salam; along the Qibla Wall.

circa 1990 CE

Bab al-Baqi Minaret
The minaret of al-Baqi' gate (ٱلْبَقِيع‎ مئذنة باب ), the most iconic minaret of the mosque, is the second tallest of the currently ten minarets of Masjid al-Nabawi. It is located on the south-eastern corner of old Ottoman era masjid. It is not only one of the oldest minarets of the mosque it is also the closest minaret to the Green Dome (القبة الخضراء) over the tomb of prophet Muhammad. The architecture of this minaret is the forerunner to all the later minarets of the mosques, except the Bab Salam minaret, which still retains its original architectural elements of Ottoman architecture.

circa 1990 CE

House of Aiesha bint Abi Bakr
The south-eastern corner of the Prophet's burial chamber (this area roughly corresponds to the location of Aiesha bint abi-Bakr's House), as viewed from Bab al-Baqi, in the left isle are the Iconic Golden Grills (Mawajjah Sharif). The western aisle (left) directly leads towards the Bab as-Salam and northern aisle (right) leads towards the Bab Jibraeel and Bab un-Nisa.

circa 610 CE

Interior of the Bab al-Baqi
Interior of Bab al-Baqi' (extreme right), with Golden Grills of the prophet Muhammad's tomb (left). Looking east towards the gate's interior from the southern aisle. The first large circular disk to the extreme left is the viewing hole towards the Maqsoora.

circa 610 CE

Minaret Base
Base of the Bab al-Baqi minaret with Bab al-Baqi's interior (extreme left) and the entrance to the medieval era minaret (small door to the left). The pillar to the extreme right is the south-east corner of the prophet's tomb. The wall of the base of the Bab al-Baqi' minaret is adorned with calligraphic inscriptions of verse from Quran. This area is the eastern end of the qibla wall.

Jannatul Baqi

circa 610 CE

Jannat ul-Baqi or Baqi ul-Gharqad

Modern day aerial view of the Jannat ul-Baqi' cemetery, after which the Bab al-Baqi' is named. View looking east, as seen from the balcony of Bab Abdulaziz minaret. It is the oldest and first designated Muslim cemetary in Madinah, the first companion from the Muhajiroon to be buried here was Uthman ibn Maz’oon who died shortly after the battle of Badr. According to the tradition more than ten thousand companions of the prophet Muhammad are buried here. There are a number of ahadith which refer to Baqi’ in the authentic traditions.

Gallery

See Also

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