Maqam Nebi Yushu (Galilee)

By the Editors of the Madain Project

  • This article is a stub as it does not provide effective content depth for the core subject discussed herein. We're still working to expand it, if you'd like to help with it you can request expansion. This tag should be removed, once the article satisfies the content depth criteria.
    What is this?

  • Following article heavily relies on religious and/or local-folk traditions and does not include verifiable archaeological or historical information. It should be rewritten to reflect the correct nature of the subject matter. Once done, this tag should be removed.

Tradition identifies the prophet Yushu, al-Nabi Yusha' (النبي يوشع), with Joshua, despite the fact that according to Tanach, Joshua was buried in Samaria, in Timnat-Serah or Timnat Jerez, where he also has a maqam in his honor; "And they buried him in the border of his inheritance in Timnath-serah that the mountain of Ephraim, north of Mount Gaash "(Iis.Nav.24: 30).

Overview

Whatever it was, this place in the mountains of Naftali is still revered by both Muslims and Jews. The shrine was surveyed by the British School of Archaeology in 1994 CE, who described it as rectangular structure formed around a courtyard, aligned north-south, which was entered through a gateway on the north end. The principal rooms were at the south end of the courtyard, with two major domed chambers, of which the west chamber was found to be the oldest in the whole shrine complex.

Alternative traditional sites for the Prophet's tomb are situated in Turkey (the shrine on Joshua's Hill, Istanbul), Jordan (an-Nabi Yusha' bin Noon, a Sunni shrine near the city of al-Salt) and Iraq (the Nabi Yusha' shrine of Baghdad).

Architecture

circa

Plan
Whatever it was, this place in the mountains of Naftali is still revered by both Muslims and Jews. The shrine was surveyed by the British School of Archaeology in 1994 CE, who described it as rectangular structure formed around a courtyard, aligned north-south, which was entered through a gateway on the north end. The principal rooms were at the south end of the courtyard, with two major domed chambers, of which the west chamber was found to be the oldest in the whole shrine complex.

See Also

References

Let's bring some history to your inbox

Signup for our monthly newsletter / online magazine.
No spam, we promise.

Privacy Policy



We need your help!

We are a small non-profit organization of volunteers, academics, history enthusiasts and IT professionals publishing the world's largest Abrahamic history encyclopedia. We only need £16,095/- to stay live in the year 2024 CE. We, the volunteers, contribute most of the funding ourselves and some comes from running the ads.

Maybe Later
Top