Tombs in Valley of the Kings

This page attempts to enlist all the known tombs in the Valley of the Kings.

circa 10 BCE

Tomb KV2, found in the Valley of the Kings, is the tomb of Ramesses IV, and is located low down in the main valley, between KV7 and KV1. It has been open since antiquity and contains a large amount of graffiti. The sarcophagus is broken (probably in antiquity), and the mummy was relocated to the mummy cache in KV35. There are two known plans of the tomb's layout contemporary to its construction. Though sizable, KV2 has been described as being "simplistic" in its design and decoration. The tomb was excavated at the base of a hill on the northwest side of the Valley of the Kings.

circa 10 BCE

Tomb KV7 of Rameses II, in the Valley of the Kings was the final resting place of Ancient Egyptian Pharaoh Ramesses II ("Ramesses the Great") of the Nineteenth Dynasty. It is located in the main valley. Unlike other tombs in the area, Tomb KV7 was placed in an unusual location and has been badly damaged by the flash floods that periodically sweep through the valley. Much of the decoration has been damaged beyond repair – its section of the Valley is particularly susceptible to flash floods – but it would have been decorated with the standard Book of Gates, Amduat and Litany of Ra.

circa 10 BCE

Tomb KV8, located in the Valley of the Kings, was used for the burial of Pharaoh Merenptah of Ancient Egypt's Nineteenth Dynasty. The burial chamber, located at the end of 160 metres of corridor, originally held a set of four nested sarcophagi. The outer one of these was so voluminous that parts of the corridor had to have their doorjambs demolished and rebuilt to allow it to be brought in. These jambs were then rebuilt with the help of inscribed sandstone blocks which were then fixed into their place with dovetail cramps.

circa 10 BCE

Tomb KV9 in Egypt's Valley of the Kings was originally constructed by Pharaoh Ramesses V. He was interred here, but his uncle, Ramesses VI, later reused the tomb as his own. The layout is typical of the 20th dynasty – the Ramesside period – and is much simpler than that of Ramesses III's tomb (KV11). The workmen accidentally broke into KV12 as they dug one of the corridors. In the Graeco-Roman period, the tomb was identified as that of Memnon, the mythological king of the Ethiopians who fought in the Trojan War.

circa 10 BCE

Tomb KV11 is the tomb of Ancient Egyptian Pharaoh Ramesses III. Located in the main valley of the Valley of the Kings, the tomb was originally started by Setnakhte, but abandoned when it broke into the earlier tomb of Amenmesse (KV10). Setnakhte was buried in KV14. The tomb KV11 was restarted and extended and on a different axis for Ramesses III. The tomb has been open since antiquity, and has been known variously as Bruce's Tomb (named after James Bruce who entered the tomb in 1768) and The Harper's Tomb (due to paintings of two blind harpers in the tomb).

circa 10 BCE

Tomb KV14 is a joint tomb, used originally by Twosret and then reused and extended by Setnakhte. The tomb has two burial chambers, the later extensions making the tomb one of the largest of the Royal Tombs, at over 112 metres. The original decoration showing the female Twosret was replaced with those of the male Setnakhte. Even later, the name of Setnakte was replaced by those of Seti II.

circa 10 BCE

Tomb KV15, located in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt, was used for the burial of Pharaoh Seti II of the Nineteenth Dynasty. The tomb was dug into the base of a near-vertical cliff face at the head of a wadi running south-west from the main part of the Valley of the Kings. It runs along a northwest-to-southeast axis, comprising a short entry corridor followed by three corridor segments which terminate in a well room that lacks a well, which was never dug. This then connects with a four-pillared hall and another stretch of corridor that was converted into a burial chamber.

circa 10 BCE

Tomb KV16 is located in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt. It was used for the burial of Pharaoh Ramesses I of the Nineteenth Dynasty. The burial place was discovered by Giovanni Belzoni in October 1817. As Ramesses I ruled for less than two years, his sepulchre is rather truncated, being only twenty-nine metres long. It consists of two descending staircases, linking a sloping corridor and leading to the burial chamber. Like the tomb of Horemheb (KV57), the grave is decorated with the Book of Gates. The sarcophagus, still in place in the final chamber, is constructed of red quartzite.

circa 10 BCE

Tomb KV17, located in Egypt's Valley of the Kings and also known by the names "Belzoni's tomb", "the Tomb of Apis", and "the Tomb of Psammis, son of Nechois", is the tomb of Pharaoh Seti I of the Nineteenth Dynasty. It is one of the best decorated tombs in the valley, but now is almost always closed to the public due to damage. When Belzoni first entered the tomb he found the wall paintings in excellent condition with the paint on the walls still looking fresh and some of the artists paints and brushes still on the floor.

circa 10 BCE

Tomb KV19, located in a side branch of Egypt's Valley of the Kings, was intended as the burial place of Prince Ramesses Sethherkhepshef, better known as Pharaoh Ramesses VIII, but was later used for the burial of Prince Mentuherkhepshef instead, the son of Ramesses IX, who predeceased his father. The first corridor was still incomplete when work was abandoned, and the tomb was used "as is". The tomb decorations show the tomb owner being escorted by his father and presented to several deities, including Osiris, Khonsu, Thoth and Ptah. What decoration which remains in this corridor is considered to be of the highest quality.

circa 10 BCE

Tomb KV57 is an ancient Egyptian tomb. Located in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt, it was used for the burial of Horemheb, the last Pharaoh of the Eighteenth dynasty. The tomb was located by Edward Ayrton in February 1908, who was working for Theodore Davis. Due to its location in the valley floor, the tomb was filled with debris that had been washed down in the occasional flash-flooding. The tomb is markedly different from the other major Eighteenth dynasty royal tombs. It does away with the dog-legged construction, and has painted bas-reliefs, rather than simple painted walls. Passages from the Book of Gates appear for the first time.

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