House of Saint Peter (Capernaum)

House of saint Peter (Latin: "Domus Ecclesia") or referes to a first century structure discovered underneath a fourth-fifth century church remains. Facing the lake shore, the residence formed the southeastern extremity of a large inhabited area. The compound had its main door on its eastern side, opening onto an open. The door jamb preserves traces of the door leaves which were bolted from the inside in the evening when people went to bed.

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circa 100 CE

Although slightly larger than most, the house of Saint Peter was simple, with coarse walls and a roof of earth and straw. Like most early Roman-period houses, it consisted of a few small rooms clustered around two open courtyards. Despite later proving to be one of the most exciting Biblical archaeology discoveries, the house appeared quite ordinary. A fish-market and frontier post beside the Sea of Galilee, Capernaum became Jesus’ home town and the scene of his activities.

circa 100 CE

The rectangular remains of the old black basalt stone walls, torn down during the construction of the octagonal church in the fifth century. Italian excavators working in Capernaum may have actually uncovered the remnants of the humble house of Peter that Jesus called home while in Capernaum. It is considered "the first church in the world" and believed it could be the place where the house of the Apostle Peter was.

circa 100 CE

The plastered floor of the inner room, or the large room, later Domus Ecclesia. In the 4th century, the room was enlarged and a central arch was added (illustration), the supporting ends of which can still be seen. The room was now the focal center of a house-church, perhaps the one built by Joseph. By 450 CE - to judge from "the hundreds of dishes stamped on the bottom with crosses" that were also found all over the site.

circa 100 CE

Mosaic lacerto. The Byzantine church dedicated to Saint Peter was paved with refined mosaics like this one with peacock (reconstruction) symbolizing the resurrection in the remains of the fourth and fifth century church of Saint Peter in Capernaum. The remains of Saint Peter's house in Capernaum were revealed when archaeologists decided to remove these mosaics to study the previous layers.

circa 100 CE

Floor plan of the structure dubbed as the House of Saint Peter (illustration) in Capernaum. Buried beneath the remains of an octagonal Byzantine martyrium church, excavators found the ruins of a rather mundane dwelling dating to the first century BCE. The "large room- later venerated room", stands out from as early as 50 CE, its floor, walls, and ceiling were plastered, a feature that does not appear anywhere else in the village. The ramins of the walls bear the graffiti; for example, “Lord Jesus Christ help your servant...”.

circa 100 CE

Coin of Caracalla (215-217 CE) found in Peter's house. During excavations remains of items from different times were found, including this coin from early third century, fragments of Herodian era oil lamps, pottery shards fron first century and even a Hellenistic lamp.

circa 100 CE

Buried (dark blue outine) beneath the remains of an octagonal Byzantine martyrium church (light blue outine), Italian excavators found the ruins of a rather mundane dwelling dating to the first century BCE. Although slightly larger than most, the house was simple, with coarse walls and a roof of earth and straw. Like most early Roman-period houses, it consisted of a few small rooms clustered around two open courtyards.

circa 100 CE

The modern Saint Peter Memorial Church also called the Pilgrimage Church of St. Peter in Capernaum is a modern Catholic pilgrimage church built over the purported site of Saint Peter's House. The church is part of the Franciscan monastery in Capernaum. It is dedicated to St. Peter, which Catholics consider the first leader of the Church.

circa 100 CE

The Capernaum Synagogue is located north of the supposed House of Saint Peter. The synagogue appears to have been built around the 4th or 5th century. Beneath the foundation of this synagogue lies another foundation made of basalt, and Loffreda suggests that this is the foundation of a synagogue from the 1st century, perhaps the one mentioned in the Gospels (Loffreda, 1974).

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