Cardo (Jerusalem)

Cardo Maximus of Jerusalem was the main north-south thoroughfare built by Hadrian in Aelia Capitolina (Roman name for the region of Israel/Palestine).

circa 200 CE

Southern Section. The cardo was originally a paved avenue approximately 22.5 meters wide (roughly the width of a six lane highway) which ran southward from the site of the Damascus gate, terminating at an unknown point. An illustration of how this main street might have looked in Roman-Byzantine times.

circa 200 CE

Southern Section. There are only five full columns standing to their original and one to partial height. Situated in the heart of the Jewish Quarter the exposed length of this section is about 150 meters and some 2.5 meters below modern street level.

circa 200 CE

Southern Section. Remains of the walls and (possible) entrances, arches in the background, to the structures along the Cardo Maximus. The Byzantine street was open to the sky in the center, but was covered on both sides with terra cotta tiles supported by wood planks.

circa 200 CE

Northern Section. Some of the excavated Cardo sections are located under the modern houses of the Jewish quarter. The following photo shows a reconstructed section, with the wooden roof planks. The pillars and some of the bricks are from the original Byzantine road.

circa 200 CE

The part of Madaba map that depicts Jerusalem with the Cardo Maximus in the center as a colonnaded street. Two important structures along the cardo were Nea Church and Holy Sepulchre. Buildings erected after 570 CE are absent from the depiction, thus limiting the date range of its creation to the period between 542 and 570 CE.

circa 200 CE

The minaret of Caliph Omar Mosque and the Hurva Synagogue as seen from across the southern section of Roman Cardo.

circa 200 CE

A model of the Byzantine city displayed in Saint Peter Gallicantu shows how central was the Cardo Maximus. It is seen here from the side of Damascus gate on the north (bottom right), straight across the entire city towards the Nea (on the far left side) and the Holy Sepulcher (on the right side) in the middle of the road.

circa 200 CE

Modern Street called HaKardo along the ancient Roman-Byzantine Cardo Maximus, the ancient remains are to the right in lower levels. Artist's impression of how this road would have looked like in its hayday.

Top
Become a contributor! :)

Like to write, edit or taking pictures?

Or we will appreciate a simple like as well.