al-Asbat Minaret

By the Editors of the Madain Project

The Minarah al-Asbat (مئذنة باب الأسباط), also known as the minaret of Saladin (المئذنة الصلاحية) is the last of the al-Aqsa minarets, it is composed of a cylindrical stone shaft (built later by the Ottomans), which springs up from a rectangular Mamluk-built base on top of a triangular transition zone. The shaft narrows above the muezzin's balcony, and is dotted with circular windows, ending with a bulbous dome. The dome was reconstructed after the 1927 Jericho earthquake.

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Overview

circa 1367 CE

The last and most notable minaret was built in 1367 CE, and is known as Minaret al-Asbat. Minarah al-Asbat, Minaret of Israel, Mad'nah al-Salahiyya, Minaret of the Tribes. Haram al-Sharif. Originally built by Mamluks it was rebuilt by Ottomans. It's dome was damaged in 1927 earthquake and was rebuilt thereafter. It is composed of a cylindrical stone shaft (built later by the Ottomans), which springs up from a rectangular Mamluk-built base on top of a triangular transition zone. The shaft narrows above the muezzin's balcony, and is dotted with circular windows, ending with a bulbous dome. The dome was reconstructed after the 1927 earthquake.

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