Great Temple of Abu Simbel

The Great Temple at Abu Simbel, which took about twenty years to build, was completed around year 24 of the reign of Ramesses the Great (which corresponds to 1265 BCE). It was dedicated to the gods Amun, Ra-Horakhty, and Ptah, as well as to the deified Rameses himself.

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circa 1300 CE

The facade of Great Temple at Abu Simbel, with four colossal statues of pharaoh with the double Atef crown of Upper and Lower Egypt. It is generally considered the grandest and most beautiful of the temples commissioned during the reign of Rameses II, and one of the most beautiful in Egypt.

circa 1300 CE

The statue of Ramses the Great at the Great Temple of Abu Simbel being reassembled after having been moved in 1967 to save it from flooding of Lake Nasser.

circa 1300 CE

Another notable feature of the facade is a stele which records the marriage of Ramesses with a daughter of king Hattusili III, which sealed the peace between Egypt and the Hittites.

circa 1300 CE

The sun worship court

circa 1300 CE

The hypostyle hall (sometimes also called a pronaos) is 18 meters long and 16.7 meters wide and is supported by eight huge Osirid pillars depicting the deified Ramses. The bas-reliefs on the walls of the pronaos depict battle scenes in the military campaigns the ruler waged.

circa 1300 CE

The second pillared hall, which has four pillars decorated with beautiful scenes of offerings to the gods, depictions of Ramesses and Nefertari with the sacred boats of Amun and Ra-Harakhti. This hall gives access to a transverse vestibule in the middle of which is the entrance to the sanctuary.

circa 1300 CE

Fisheye view of the inner transverse vestibule. Most of the scenes in the vestibule relate to the sacrifice provision. Ramses offers wine to the god Min- Amun and Horus of Meha, milk to Amun-Re, giving bread to the Atum, and flowers to the god Ptah, in addition to small statue of Maat to Thoth.

circa 1300 CE

The open court is surrounded by mud brick wall from the north and the south. It seems that parts of wall has been rebuilt and re-constructed in Roman times, and this is clear through the large mud-brick blocks, which was a feature of the Roman era. In this north mud-brick wall, there is stone gateway that connects between the great temple and the temple of Nefertari.

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